Top 3 Tips For Motorcycling Around Australia

A couple of our old students have just returned from an around Australia motorbike trip – 17,000 kms in 29 days, taking in:

  • Savannah Way across the Top End
  • Legendary Gibb River Road through the Kimberleys
  • That long stretch called the Nullarbor!
  • Around Tasmania
  • Over the Snowy Mountains

Brendon and Jack are a father and son duo who do a few adventures together (they once cycled across Australia before coming to the realisation a bike is much easier with a motor on it!) and rode around on a Suzuki VStrom 650 (Brendon) and a KLR 650 (Jack).

Top 3 Tips From The Lads

1.  Dropping your bike in a creek with crocodiles isn’t advisable

At the first creek crossing that had the “Don’t Stop, Crocodiles Live Here” Sign, Brendon managed to crash in the middle.

And don't drop your bike in the creek!
And don’t drop your bike in the creek!

He tells me it was one of those moments in life where he looks up, wondering if his 20 year old son in rushing through the water to help ……or sitting on the bank watching??!!

Turns out Jack was running through the water to help – or as he puts it

“I had a GoPro on Shona, I was after a better camera angle if a croc got him!  Funniest Home Videos here I come!”

2.  Little things matter – yes, even that cap on the valve matters a lot

To save the time it takes to unscrew the valves and screw them back on each time tyre pressures are checked, Brendon decided to just toss the valves.

Bad move!

The centrifugal force of the tyre spinning can actually force air out of the valve and provide a slow leak.  That’s something Brendon found out when he was in the middle of nowhere with a slowly deflating front tyre.

A few days later Brendon check his back tyre pressure.  That’s when the valve pin dislodged and his back wheel deflated.  If he had a cap handy he could of put it back on and stopped the deflation.

Yes, little things matter a lot – even valve caps!

3.  Always Check Your Stand Is Down – Especially In Front Of 40 People

The most the lads dropped their bikes was in service stations – a couple of times when they thought the stand was down, a pannier hitting a pole, stand down in very soft sand and more.

Jack's bike was tired so had a lie down
Jack’s bike was tired so had a lie down on Tasmania’s West Coast

Leaving aside the embarrassment of the amateur move (okay, we’ve all done it!), things can break when a bike has a bit of a lie down.
So be extra sure.

A Kind Word

Both Brendon and Jack learned to ride here at AMA and had these very nice words for us:

“Shona, there’s no doubt in my mind the training you guys gave us – and then the extra bits of advice – have made a massive difference to how we ride and kept us 100 times safer than we would have otherwise been.

The success of AMA QRide is a great credit to yourself, Graham, Andrew and your exceptional team.”

Thanks lads and nice riding.

Shona

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *